Tips for Packing Glass and Other Fragile Materials

One of the more stressful tasks to take on during a move is packing up all that glass, fine china, and other fragile goods. Some opt to use bubble wrap and heavy boxes, others newspaper and crates. Whatever packaging material you decide to use, check out these tips to up your glass packing game.

Use Appropriate Packing Material

Don’t store fragile items with heavy or bulky items. During the move, large items can shift and shatter light delicate glasses or crack the plastic on fragile electronics. Store your glass together and don’t be afraid to use multiple boxes full of packing material. There are various types of packing material:

-Newspaper: Readily available, recyclable and biodegradable. Newspaper can be used to wrap glass plates and bowls, or to stuff inside delicate vases and cups. Make sure all the glass is covered and use excess newspaper to fill empty spaces in the box. Newspaper isn’t the best packing material for electronics. Moving Companies and packaging stores sell newsprint that doesn’t have writing on it. This helps keep your items and your hands clean and not full of black ink.

-Bubble wrap: While not biodegradable, this light-weight, flexible plastic can also be used to wrap electronics. You can also ball it up and stuff it in empty spots to provide more cushioning and support.

-Packing Peanuts: Usually made of Styrofoam, packing peanuts are not eco-friendly and a bit messy, but can help fill up empty spots in boxes more so than other packaging materials. Use these to add cushioning and fill the box rather than engulf your items with just these entirely. If you’re worried about the environment, consider biodegradable starch peanuts instead.

You’re not restricted to just one of these, so use a combination to minimize the chance of glass or fragile items breaking. Remember the more paper and packing material you use the less likely something will break.

Prepare Against Inclement Weather

If you’re moving during winter, keep in mind that cold temperatures can cause glass to become brittle. You’ll want to pack a little more thoroughly or use more packing supplies to ensure the safety of your products. For rainy weather, make sure your packing supplies don’t get wet.
Also keep in mind the road conditions during the move. If there has been heavy snow, consider how the moving van may brake or turn in these conditions. Slippery roads could encourage the truck and its items to slide or bump around. If you are moving yourself make sure when packing up the moving van your glass is secure and will not slide or fall during the move.

What’s in the Box Matters

If you are packing yourself cardboard wine boxes can be used to move your glassware. The divided sections within the box are made to provide support to glass items so use this to your advantage. Other boxes to consider are thicker walled or heavier bottomed boxes. Moving Companies use dish packs or mini dish because they are a thicker heavier box. Because they are a thicker box they won’t crush as easily and you can stack other boxes on top without worry. When packing your box, put heavier items on the bottom and pack your glass on top. And don’t over pack! Leave space at the top and fill it with newsprint or newspaper.
If you’re unsure how to pack your glass safely, give All Reasons Moving a call. Our experienced workers can help you figure out what packing materials are best for your move.

Tips for Packing Glass and Other Fragile Materials

One of the more stressful tasks to take on during a move is packing up all that glass, fine china, and other fragile goods. Some opt to use bubble wrap and heavy boxes, others newspaper and crates. Whatever packaging material you decide to use, check out these tips to up your glass packing game.

Use Appropriate Packing Material

Don’t store fragile items with heavy or blocky items. During the move, large items can shift and shatter light, delicate glasses or crack the plastic on fragile electronics. Store your glass together and don’t be afraid to use multiple boxes full of packing material. There are various types of packing material:

  • Newspaper: Readily available, recyclable and biodegradable. Newspaper can be used to wrap glass plates and bowls, or to stuff inside delicate vases and cups. Make sure all the glass is covered and use excess newspaper to fill empty spaces in the box. Newspaper isn’t the best packing material for electronics.
  • Bubble wrap: While not biodegradable, this light-weight, flexible plastic can also be used to wrap electronics outside of glass. You can also ball it up and stuff it in empty spots to provide more cushioning and support.
  • Packing Peanuts: Usually made of Styrofoam, packing peanuts are not eco-friendly and a bit messy, but can help fill up empty spots in boxes more so than other packaging materials. Use these to add cushioning and fill the box rather than engulf your items with just these entirely. If you’re worried about the environment, consider biodegradable starch peanuts instead.

You’re not restricted to just one of these, so use a combination to minimize the chance of glass or fragile items breaking.

Prepare Against Inclement Weather

If you’re moving during winter, keep in mind that cold temperatures can cause glass to become brittle. You’ll want to pack a little more thoroughly or use more packing supplies to ensure the safety of your products. For rainy weather, make sure your packing supplies don’t get wet. Bubble wrap and Styrofoam peanuts will be all right. Newspaper and biodegradable starch peanuts will not fare well in wet conditions and could fall apart, resulting in loss of cushioning for your glass items.

Also keep in mind the road conditions during the move. If there has been heavy snow, consider how the moving van may brake or turn in these conditions. Slippery roads could encourage the truck and its items to slide or bump around. When packing up the moving van, make sure your glass is secured with no heavy items on top and make sure it is unable to slide or fall during the move.

What’s in the Box Matters

If you can, try to use cardboard wine cases to move your glass. The divided sections within the box are made to provide support to glass items so use this to your advantage. Other boxes to consider are thicker walled or heavier bottomed boxes. In addition to thicker walls, these can also provide support and minimize tipping during the move. When packing your box, put non-fragile items on the bottom and pack your glass on top. Make sure your glass is packed together but don’t overpack! Leave some space at the top so you can fill it with some more helpful packing materials.

If you’re unsure whether your glass is safe, check out our post featuring some of the packaging material we offer our customers. If you’ve still go questions, give All Reasons Moving a call. Our experienced workers can help you figure out what packing materials are best for your move.

Packing your Computer for Moving

ComputerIf you are worried about safely packing & moving your computer, laptop or tower to your new home, relax. Your fragile computer equipment will arrive intact without you having to bring it in your car. This is great news, especially if you are not able to take them on your person. Original packing material is the best way to move them. However, most of us don’t keep that, so follow these tips on safely packing your computers, laptops and towers.

  1. Backup all data on every device. If you are already enrolled in an online service like Mozy Online Backup or Carbonite that provides continuous backup via the Internet, only do this if you want to double-ensure data. Store a backup drive or disks with other valuables and papers.
  2. Remove any CDs from drive. Insert a blank or unimportant CD into the drive to stabilize it.
  3. Shut down computers, disconnect cables. Properly eject peripheral devices, and power down all computers, laptops, towers, modems, routers, etc. Be sure you’re done with all computing needs: this is it! As you unplug cables, label each one with masking tape, or indelible marker write on the cable itself to indicate which computer it’s paired to, and which socket it plugs into upon your arrival. Gently coil cables and secure with tape or zip ties, twisty ties work well also, this helps to prevent unraveling.
  4. Packing into the box. Bottom line: pack to prevent jarring. Assuming you no longer have the original box and stiff Styrofoam protectors, pack the computer into a very sturdy moving box larger than the computer. It should be large enough to accommodate plenty of packing paper but not so large that the computer swims around in it.
  5. Crumble up several sheets of paper and put on the bottom of the box. Crumbling the paper makes it fluffy.  You can use popcorn but unless you’ve got a resource for this it can get expensive. Place the tower or monitor in the box. Crumble up more paper filling in the space between the computer and the box so the computer does not shift. Remember to put paper on the top of the computer as well for padding between the computer and the lid.
  6. Small items. Pack associated cables or small peripherals with their corresponding computer. If you do this, be sure to accurately label the contents of each box so that nothing gets thrown out in the packing paper.
  7. Box Weight Capacity and Taping. Choose a box that has a weight capacity higher than the weight of the electronics you are putting into them. Tape the boxes very securely, and label them all clearly.  Keep in mind places like Home Depot sell boxes at a cheap price but they are very flimsy and cannot hold a lot of weight. Check out the weight and capacity of the box before purchasing.

At All Reasons Moving, we understand how vital your computer is to daily functioning. Following these guidelines, you will be up and running at your new home in no time.

Packing & Storing Holiday Decorations

Packing & Storing Holiday DecorationsThe Holiday Season is here and people are starting to think about bringing out Holiday Decorations. Packing and storing all your decorations can be a daunting task. In California there aren’t many musty attics storing holiday decorations in homes, but many of us have dusty, cobwebbed garages or storage sheds outside. While some people look forward to the project of dragging out huge crates of decorations and transforming their homes (well, the transforming part is fun; the dragging part not so much), many of us dread all of it; especially the back end of the process: tearing down holiday decorations, and storing them away until next year.

Decorating your home for the holidays doesn’t have to drive you crazy. With a little planning, you can unpack, decorate, repack and store precious holiday decorations in a systematic way that saves time and space.
Seasonal holiday decorating typically starts in October for Halloween, not ending until after New Year. For some brave souls it extends into Valentine’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day and ultimately the Fourth of July. From the 4th on, there’s a breather until the cycle begins again.
Enjoy these tips for making the holiday decoration process, including storage and preservation, enjoyable while extending the life of your precious objects and art.

  • Evaluate your decorations. Decorations break, parts and pieces get lost. Prior to the intended holiday (when you are less in the mood to save every little thing), or as you are unpacking, sort through the decorations. Throw out broken ones you’ll never fix, give away those you haven’t used, don’t have place to display, or don’t like. Keep only the most important decorations.
  • Have the right storage boxes. We recommend plastic crates for storing and you can color code your crates. Red and green crates for Christmas, orange for your Halloween decorations. Also, plastic crates are easy to label with a marker. After the purging process, evaluate remaining decorations and purchase sturdy, manageable crates to store what’s left.
  • Store boxes appropriately. If you can’t reach decoration boxes without a ladder, and the ladder is unwieldy or hard to get to you’re setting yourself up for frustration. Make your decoration boxes easy to reach and easy to see.
  • Keep original packing where possible. People think that original packaging is meant for one-time use: when unpacking! It is often impossible to get an item back into its original box, and you can’t imagine how it was achieved in the first place. Unless it is very flimsy, keep and reuse original packaging, some of your more delicate decorations are best protected in their original boxes.

Packing for Storage: When the season’s over, and you’re tearing down decorations, follow these steps:

  • Room by room, gather all decorations. Put them onto a large, central table or at least all in the same room. There’s nothing worse than thinking you’re done only to find a nutcracker high on a bookcase. Look, look and look again.
  • When all decorations are collected, match things with original boxes.
  • Throw out, or immediately repair broken decorations. If you aren’t willing to repair something, discard it.
  • Carefully wrap and store the rest, labeling boxes as you go. When you know everything fits into a container, you can continue replacing decorations into the same box, year after year, knowing everything fits.

For more helpful tips on packing check out: Packing for Storage blog

Over sized or expensive decorations. If you have a 5-ft. tall Nutcracker or priceless carousel horse, consider long-term, climate-controlled storage. Expensive or over sized objects can get worn down by weather, moisture and rodents as easily as a spice candle, and are harder to replace.  Many moving companies and storage facilities have climate controlled storage. Your elaborately decorated 7-ft. faux Christmas tree will be safe and fresh if kept in a secure storage facility.
We wish you happy decorating, and a happy, stress-free holiday season!

Home Moving Security

Home SecurityWhile packing and getting ready for your home move you need to think about where to put all those boxes and how to keep things safe. In a perfect world, theft, burglary and taking things that don’t belong to us would never happen. Sadly, however, stealing does happen, and people use tough economic times as an excuse to cross the line.  More and more people are finding themselves victims of break ins. Especially at a vulnerable time such as during a move, it pays to be prepared and vigilant.

Prevention is your best defense. This article will focus on garage safety, since if you are moving your home you are likely to begin stacking boxes and valuables in your garage.

Did you know that there are videos on YouTube, which show how burglars can open an electric garage door in less than 10 seconds without breaking anything? There are inexpensive deterrent devices you can buy online to prevent this. Check out The Garage Shield for more information.

Think about it: if you were a thief, wouldn’t you rather simply walk away with a couple of packed boxes, rather than juggle a bunch of separate bulky items?

It is difficult, but up until the actual moving day, try to never let it look like you are moving. If your garage is attached to your home, keep the garage door closed. As you are packing move packed boxes into the garage for storage. If your garage is detached, it is not always practical to keep the door lowered as you move boxes back and forth. If possible, use the side door, or obscure the activity in your garage by parking cars in front of the garage.

As a general rule, keep your garage door lowered whenever possible, even when you are home. If you have a garage side door, be sure it has a deadbolt, and keep it locked when not in use. If there are decorative glass panes at the top of your garage door, or a window on the side of the garage, cover them with paper from inside.

You won’t be able to completely hide the fact that you are packing to move your home and storing items in your garage, especially from someone who is intent on looking, but your vigilant behavior will be a deterrent. Try to change your routine, install motion sensor lights over the garage, a barking dog is always a good deterrent. You can install inexpensive motion detectors which can be purchased at your local Lowes.

With a few simple precautions, your garage can be a safe storage area until moving day.  If you are moving things to your new home ahead of time. Remember to secure that garage and house, no one is living there yet which makes it an easy target for someone to enter during the night and take everything you just moved over.

Packing Your Kitchen for Moving

Packing your kitchen dishes and stemware properly for moving is essential to making sure everything gets to the final destination without casualties. Packing & moving is stressful and everyone always worries about packing properly.  Following our instructions you can be sure everything gets to the other end without any damage.  The key to successful packing is PAPER. You want to use lots of paper to wrap the dishes and glasses.

Supplies Needed:

  • Newspaper or Newsprint
  • Boxes (dish packs are thicker and sturdier for packing breakables)
  • Tape
  • Marker

Tips for packing:

  • First place a table pad or cardboard box on your table to protect the table from scratching
  • Then gather up all your supplies
  • Lay out a stack of paper (you can use newspaper but the ink can be messy, newsprint is cleaner)
  • Set the items to be packed on the table so you can reach them easily and don’t have to walk back and forth to the cupboards
  • After you have a box built crumble some paper in the bottom of the box (dish packs are best for breakables because the box is thicker and more sturdy)
  • Then starting with your plates you can begin wrapping your breakables and placing them in the box TIP: Plates are strongest when stood on end and not laying down
  • Put a couple sheets of paper in between each layer as you are packing
  • The top row of your box you can put lighter items such as stemware or tuperware
  • Place a few sheets of paper on the top and close the box
  • Always remember to label the top and sides of all your boxes
YouTube Preview Image

GET YOUR
FREE
QUOTE NOW

Call Us Now
(408) 240-0244

If Residential, what type of dwelling?

If Business, how many employees?

All Reasons Moving

All Reasons Moving

Web Analytics